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. and united nations climate conference, the u.s. is told it's not doing enough to stop temperatures from chiming. china and india, and other major polluters want us to pay more. we're calling this a global money grab. they want us, they want more money from us. and here with the nrdc action fund. why are we the targets of-- why are we the villains here? >> well, stuart, i think that we're looking out for american interests here and this climate change is a threat to americans and we see that threat across the summer. the worst drought that i know. >> i've got the talking points, but this is the united nations, this is the united nations china is saying, you americans, you're the villains here and india saying the same thing. and china's the world's largest polluter. why are we the villains here? why is it the united nations is the vehicle to screw money out of us? >> well, i think that we need to take a global approach. it's a global problem and you make a good point. china is part of the problem, and india, japan, europe we're all part of the problem and take a global approach. stuart:
nations u.s. ambassador to the united nations has requested three meetings -- meetings with three senators tomorrow. senator kelly, john mccain, and lindsay gramm. the ambassador wishes to speak with them. i am sure she will -- by snc will be accommodated. i am wondering how much mcconnell feels right about now. >> well, interesting thing for the demonstration at this point, the president is sort of trap now in nominating ambassador rice as secretary of state. waiting for the moment that hillary clinton, waiting for her to give the word, but the president, having stood so strong in her defense, strongly in her defense around what she said that up and gauzy and the video that she said was the cause of the attack that killed those americans that now they are boxed in. he pretty well has to stick with her. this is are going around to say in private what she was in public which, based on the testimony from the general and others is, it was a calculation that it was a decision that was made at the white house that it would be bad business to be out saying that it was a terrorist. lou: what is y
at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama administration is re-using digital information gathered for the campaign to rally support now. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: washington was a-whirl today with m
to the united nations susan rice, of course, blaming the intelligence community for her claim that the benghazi consulate terror attacks grew out of a protest over an anti-muslim film. just before the election, she repeated what she describes as a preliminary assessment on five different sunday talk shows before the truth emerged that it was, in fact, a coordinated terror attack carried out after consulate security had asked for more security. joining us now is john bolton, former u.s. ambassador to the united nations. he's a fox news contributor, and it's always good the see you, sir, thanks very much for your time. >> glad to be with you. rick: she based her statements solely and squarely on intelligence. what do you think of her comments? >> well, i think she's made a mistake personally and professionally. you'll notice from that clip you just ran she was standing at the press stakeout position outside the security council where you respond to reporters' questions. she was reading from a prepared statement. you'll see she was looking down. so this, this was carefully thought out in advance.
. >> yes, it is. >> bill: i have a library out back. this book is about the united nations taking over the world. right? >> not really. if you like some like "hunger games" or" 1984", it's a fictionalized story of let's take what's in the book from the united nations and then let's play it out. what does the world look like if that is -- if that's your framework. >> bill: what's agenda 21? >> it's all about sustainable food, sustainable environment, social justice, economic justice, and it is something that the united nations, through george h.w bush, put in, went into our federal level, now down to our state and local level, and it's all about controlling almost every aspect of your life for the greater good. >> bill: now, when you say george bush the elder, he was the u.n. ambassador at the time, right? >> he was the president. >> bill: he was the president. >> he signed it in and repeated the president's council for sustainable development. >> bill: so you take this, which in theory is probably a good thing. we want a clean environment. >> but if you look at what they say the proble
in the dire warnings. coming up new at 10. find out exactly what the united nations plans to do about it. can anybody say carbon tax? yeah, you can. back to nicole, today, what have we got. best buy a loser? why? >> well, yesterday we talked about their numbers. they were a loser yesterday about their same-store sales for yet another quarter. nine of the last ten quarters have shown decline. today, well, let's see, one analyst downgraded best buy. how about deutche bank? yep, how about bernstein. >> yep, jeffers, you get the point. and while they're doing well with mobile phones, appliances, tablet computers and e-readers, no on notebooks, gaming products. they're missing the numbers, off to the ten year low. stuart: that's analysts when they turn against you, it can be grim, can't it? nicole, thank you. dead flat market, but the market has reached 12-8. we're up 13 points. time is money, 30 seconds, here is what else we have today. i'm a capitalist and i lovemaking money and i don't blame stores for being open tomorrow. because the customers want to shop. is there something wrong when people
the motive there is not clear. and a fox urgent now. for the first time tonight, united nations ambassador susan rice is fighting back against her critics. first the back story here. she went on five sunday morning talk shows days after the attack on the consulate in benghazi that killed our ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. and said it was due to anger over that film insulting islam. we now know that was wrong. u.s. officials acknowledged it was a coordinated terror attack. republic lawmakers said ambassador rice was either deliberately misleading or quote incompetent. just minutes ago she spoke at the u.n. and took those critics to task. listen. >> when discussing the attacks against our facilities in benghazi, i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. everyone, particularly the intelligence community, has worked in good faith to provide the best assessment based on the information available. >> last week
] jenna: back to our big story today from the united nations security council condemning the escalating violence between hamas and israel. the statement was blocked by the united states. our country says the u.n. is missing the cause of this crisis. but what is the un's role on this price overall? we will talk to john bolton asked about that. and a world boxing to be fighting for his life after he was shot in the face. we are live at the breaking news desk of that story [ male announcer ] are you considering a new medicare plan? then you may be looking for help in choosg the right plan for your needs. so don't wait. call now. whatever your health coverage needs, unitedhealthcare can help you find the right plan. are you looking for something nice and easy? a medicare advantage plan can give you doctor, hospital and prescription drug coverage all in one plan... for nothing more than what you already pay for part b. you'll also have the flexibility to change doctors from a network of providers dedicated to helping you stay healthy. call now to learn more. unitedhealthcare has the informat
. it was the security council under the charter of the united nations that put that pressure. of course we know that this system worked extremely well. it was 100% performance as a matter of fact. it's not bad for any u.n. organization to get the task and then i think it's probably the only one which succeeded to make it 100% performance. so the -- that means that both destruction capabilities and the monetary capabilities were forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of w
and then the united nations following world war ii is no more. they are in dissent of the magnitude of human tragedies. the population exchanges, and the damage done to the infrastructure of the country. in the material sense, and we are talking about the country of 2 million people, and more than 25 million who have been displaced. only by a week ago, the refugees that were 160 # ,000, lebanon more, and jordan even at the same skill of turkey. our refugees, apart from those who are displaced within the country itself, and the regime in damascus cannot add to the control nearly 70% of the countryside of syria, and its urban centers, damascus and other parts, are battlegrounds between the oppositions and the regime so the -- before this started, reach today, march 15, 20 # 11, we could never think that we have too much -- march 14, 2011, it's over. the syria -- [inaudible] the question we face in turkey, the region, and all over the world, what we know is that the religion ended, and yet the paradox is religion is in place in damascus so the question is when and how -- what day we will see assad reigni
your ambassador to the united nations you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparations and responsibilities for that job and that is troubling to me. jenna: kelly wright, live in washington with more. kelly, the three senators just held the news briefing which we played a little bit from kelly ayotte. tell us generally what was their response? what sort of reaction they had to what they heard inside that closed-door meeting? >> reporter: let's stay on focus on that because that is really telling. each senator saw the tone being stunned by the information they heard in this closed-door meeting with u.n. ambassador susan rice. they are significantly troubled they say, more than that ever, which means there are more questions than answers as a result of this meeting. even saying that rice ace comments were clearly wrong. >> what happened initially was it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and right after that, during that news briefing that we heard, we heard from actually senator lindse
are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks ago when she said the benghazi attacks did not appear preplanned. she said that reflected the best intelligence at the time. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary and that our investigations would give us the definitive answers. >> reporter: but intelligence officials told congress last week they knew almost from the start that benghazi was likely the work of terrorists, perhaps affiliated with al qaeda. in an appearance on "face the nation" five days after the attack, rice gave no hint of that. >> we d
strong support for the ambassador. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job for the united nations and is qualified for a number of positions in the foreign policy arena. i will leave it at that. >> president obama shows his support of susan rice as well. he had his first white house news conference after his election. the president took exception to republican senators critical of rice. if they want to come after any one they should come after me. >> kelly wright, thank you very much. senator lindsay graham is one of the three senators who have a lot of questions for ambassador rice. >> he gave us a preview of what he will be looking for during today's discussion. >> she asked to meet with us i will listen to what she has to say about her role in benghazi. the more i know about benghazi the more upset i am that the consulate was even open on september 11th. when you look at the history about the dangers we should never have been open or heavily reinforced. during the attack i am more core idea about how we couldn't help them for 7 hours. a spontaneous event caused by video turn nu
tuned, as they say. joining us now, former u.s. ambassador not united nations, john bolten, andrew mccarthy, former federal prosecutor who convicted the blind shake, and the author of "spring fever." great to have you both here. andrew, your reaction to what is playing out in the nation's capital. this is the nation's capital -- capital of a superpower; right? >> so they say. a lot of misspeaking going on, it would appear. you know, look, it's been obvious from the start here that they tried to play out the idea of this video nobody saw of this being the cause of the atrocity of what happened in benghazi in which four, including our ambassador, were killed. it's important to get to the bottom of it, and getting to the bottom of it, a comedy of error, should not obscure the fact this is a major advocation by the commander in chief who did not take action in a seven and a half hour siege with assets in place he could have used to protect americans, and we have this inexplicable result of americans being killed, precisely because of the way the president handled it. lou: ambassador, this
diplomatic issues. in 1971, the united nations in 1969. they were in the area and we have been re-integrating everything. for the first 75 years, we have never received the people's republic of china and the u.n. report -- they changed this position on the island. and to me, i don't want to get into that too many details. frankly, this is not the heart of the issue. china is trying to advance. there is an issue with japan. from japan to taiwan, the philippines, this is from the viewpoint of china. china has openly expressed their views on this in maritime security. and those are part of the reality. so this is a kind of comprehensive strategy to advance. >> that is an important point. what you're basically saying is that this is about power and the power -- china is clearly becoming more powerful. you are seeing lines being challenged. i remember talking to george soros once after he broke the back of england -- i'm sorry, broke the bank of england. what he saw as a hedge fund manager basically drove so hard against the wind that fundamentally the institutional power on the bank o
.s. ambassador to the united nations, susan rice defends herself about comments about benghazi, responding directly to her harshest critics. >>> giving thanks following superstorm sandy. trying to lift the siepirits of those left with nothing. >>> plus this. >>> good morning to you. happy thanksgiving. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for spending at least part of your holiday with us. for the first time in more than a week, it has been a relatively quiet day across israel and fwa gaza. the cease fire is holding. at the border, israeli troops are packing up after spending one final night there. israeli forces says when the cease fire started, three rockets were fired into israel. two hit open areas and the third was intercepted by the iron dome missile defense system. if everything remains this relatively quiet until 2:00 eastern this afternoon, the gaza border crossings will open. rallies opened in the streets as they celebrated what they call a victory over israel. the prime minister says he's dedicated the victory to that man, ahmed al ja'abari, killed in that air strike. as you kn
's because while opposed to her from her position as ambassador of the united nations and nothing could change my mind on that. bill: based on that answer it appears you are willing to take that answer higher than susan rice with it comes to benghazi. >> this will go down as the biggest coverup in history. they all knew it. they are hoping to have it go beyond the election date which it did. but people are not going to forget it. the administration deliberately covered this and misrepresented what happened in benghazi threatened up in the both of four people. one of whom was a good friend of mine, ambassador stevens. bill: the biggest coverup in american history. >> yes, sir. bill: when senator lieberman came out yesterday afternoon --'s listed as an independent. but he seemed to take more of a sill sill tory tone towards he -- he seemed to take more a conciliatory tone towards sue and rice. you wonder if this is a republican versus democrat issue. if that's the case, you are in the minority. >> that's true. senator lieberman is neither republican nor democrat but he's on the democrat s
.n., that is the date of the so-called partition of palestine resolution, dating back to 1947 by united nations. that has symbolic meaning as well. and the israelis, not only the israelis have opposed it, but the united states has opposed it. and it will pass most likely because this is a general assembly issue not a security council issue. to but the united states -- -- they are trying to make a point by retaliating in some big way. that will have a cost for the palestinian authority. what does that mean? hamas will emerge as an even bigger winner. there will say, look at what he is getting you have got to vote, but what good did that to do? our way is the best day. get missiles. so that is the political dilemma for the united states. host: leila on our line for independents, go ahead. caller: my comment is, you always have to negotiate with people. when negotiated not only with friends, but with enemies. the enemies have to be [indiscernible] what we initially wanted to do when we sent the president oversees. -- once and for all. guest: hamas is delivering in gazgaza. my own position, just fo
from the united nations. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios [ male announcer ] a european-inspired suspension, but it's not from germany. ♪ a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ we are gathered here today to celebrate the union of tim and laura. it's amazing how appreciative ople are when you tell them they could save a lot of money on their car insurance by switching to geico...they may even make you their best man. may i have the rings please? ah, helzberg diamonds. nice choice, mate. ...and now in the presence of these guests we join this loving couple. oh dear... geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. . >>> turkey and football and shopping and napping and napping are a thanksgiving weekend traditions, but so is helping, and that's why members of the baptist of the ark
and provocative acts in the persian gulf. in letters to the united nations, iran said the navy repeatedly violated its air space. the iranian ambassador claims u.s. jets and drones have flown over the country, disregarding radio warnings. >>> the young pakistani girl who survived an assassination attempt by the taliban may not be going back to pakistan. 15-year-old malala yousufzai, who was shot in the head for speaking out for girls' education, could make britain her permanent home. her father is considering a job at the pakistani consulate. >>> and finally this morning, the white house is getting in the christmas spirit. first lady michelle obama and daughters, malia and sasha, received the christmas tree on friday, which arrived on a horse-drawn charge. it's from a farm in north carolina and will be displayed in the blue room. they have a head start on me. i'm notorious for putting up a tree on december 23rd. >> ours is december 26th. >> it stays up until like march. >> nice to see bo in that shot, too. did you see bo, the dog? >> just like the girls, he's huge. >> he's grown. >> alex, thank yo
to you. it is 14 minutes after the hour. here's a look at what you missed while you were sleeping. united nations announce ago new round of talks today in kwut tar on global warming. even though a lot of country's budgets are strained by big financial problems some countries say they will spend more cash tackling the climate issue. service into lower manhattan along the trade centerine has resumed. sandy has knocked down that line. another one affected is running again through the hard hit long beach area but on a weekend schedule. perfect. thank you, heather. >> cyber monday is just getting started. retarryls are already hailing this weekend. estimated $59 billion for stores on-line. we are all breaking down the numbers for a red-letter day. >> 247 million shoppers visiting storeses as well as their web site. they spent $427 each. now on-line spending on black friday alone also surged. first ever thanksgiving thursday also brought in solid numbers with more than $6 million spent on the web on the holiday. >> you covered thursday and friday how about today? >> it is likely to believe the
. >>> israel is facing a setback at the united nations as france is announcing it plans to vote for palestinian statehood. the u.n. general assembly set to vote on this day after tomorrow on whether to recognize a palestinian state. france is the first major european country to announce it will support the resolution and analysts say the measure is likely to pass. israel and the united states said the only true path to statehood would involve a peace agreement with israel. this week's vote will also happen against the backdrop of a fragile cease fire between the israelis and their forces and the militants from hamas. >>> workers cracked open the grave today of the late palestinian leader yasser arafat. it's all part of an investigation into whether somebody poisoned him. assassinated him even. he died in 2004. what killed him is still officially a mystery. israel has denied poisoning him at all. but over the summer, a lab in switzerland detected traces of a radioactive material in stains on his clothing. the current palestinian leader authorized this investigation to determine once and for all
is formerly the u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. it's nice to have you with us, sir. >> good morning, soledad. >> so yesterday we were reporting at this hour that there were reports that the aggression would stop within hours. then there reports that there would be a 24-hour calm period, that came from a senior hamas official. then we know that hillary clinton was in the region, going from meeting to meeting with netanyahu, and heading eventually to meet with mohamed mursi. now we have this violence with a bus. has the window of opportunity, which it seemed like the secretary was trying to exploit, or leverage, has that closed, do you think, with this explosion? >> first of all, this was a reprehensible terrorist attack. but i don't think it closes the window. you've got these very serious talks ongoing about a long-term solution to things like, you know, border security, the rocket attacks, and a lot of international pressure brought to bear by both arab countries, the united states, and the u.n. so, no, i think that this represents an escalation, but i
support. >> ambassador rice has done an excellent job at the united nations and highly qualified for any number of positions in the foreign policy arena and i will leave it at that. >> today's meeting place between ambassador rice and her staunchest critics on capitol hill. after his reelection president obama took exception to republican senators critical of rice saying if they want to come after anyone they should come after me. >> gretchen: we remember that. why is no one talking about susan rice, she went out on the talk shows and got the talking points from the white house and said what they wanted her to say. >> brian: she said the intelligence. >> gretchen: that's why she would be secretary of state. she did what she was asked to do and did it well and it worked with the electorate you could argue and now she will be secretary of state. what is going to stop it? >> steve: not necessarily. senate aides. administration is having her sell herself up on capitol hill today and what she is doing, she is appealing to the moderates, in particular republicans from georgia and tennessee. th
're an ambassador to the united nations -- i want to get your thoughts on this. she said, look, you go well beyond unclassified talking points in your daily preparation responsibilities. i guess the implication being that she would have been aware of other things that were different or contradicted directly to what she went and said on television. does this cast any doubt on her story? general clark has made what i've heard from everybody who knows her that she is an incredibly honest and forthright person. >> well, i think there's a bigger question here, erin, and that's the credibility of the administration on these national security issues and whether they politicized a national security issue that led to the death of four americans. i mean, i do -- i don't agree that the american people were not misled on this. i don't know how five days afterwards, a senior official -- first of all, i don't understand why susan rice was in that chair as opposed to hillary clinton as u.n. ambassador, she had nothing to do with what happened in benghazi. but besides that, you know, the issue here is why did the
the united nation's reviews much more than that. i [inaudible] >> before anyone can make an intelligent decision regarding someone involved in benghazi, we need to do a lot more for the state. we don't have the fbi interviews of the survivors one or two days after the attack. we don't have the basic information about what was said tonight at the attack has been shared with congress says that this day. so i remember the episode pretty well. our democratic friends thought like john bolton didn't have the information needed to make an informed decision qualification. john bolton the ambassador and democrats talk in their fields saying we're not going to vote, not going to consider this nomination until they get basic answers to our concerns. .. >> we are now live with condoleezza rice and former chancellor of new york city public schools. they will discuss america's education system and its impact on security. it is part of a event hosted by the excellence in foundation for education. right now we are listening to introductory remarks. >> the first african-american woman to
? ambassador is former ambassador to the united nations for special political affairs, are they better or worse now? >> they are in a process. president morsi's move was clearly an overreach. where they are now is negotiating a constitution. what opponents of morsi will say in shaping this constitution they will put in to place into effect a permanent of dominance for the muslim brotherhood. that is why they are so up in arms because they fought against mubarek for many years. >> gregg: isn't that what is happening here. he has usurped all power, he has pronounced these untouchables and new fair oh of egypt and they are calling him. tens of thousands have taken the street to denounce morsi and burning the offices of muslim brotherhood in two cities. where do you see this going, ambassador? >> there was broad support for mubarek after and many people in the streets of cairo and egypt think that the former regime got off lightly. with that said, i think there is a widespread ceiling they are entering a new phase in which the fundamental institutions and democratic protections are in jeopardy. tha
was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation. so winning the civil rights a precondition of winning the liberty across the globe. no i think looking from the outside if you'll forgive me, the same danger now. go to china and i criticize them for the lack of democracy. but they say yes, they are educating all of their people. in the middle east and i talked to people there on the edge of radicalism. they say look at the -- [inaudible] justices in your british and european and ame
rice of the united nations for going out on television and saying that story. clearly was not true, from what we know now, but guys like you are being criticized by, for instance, members of the congressional black caucus. they say that you and john mccain are sexist and racist as well for criticizing ambassador rice. >> well, when you can't answer the question, you attack the questioner. the only color i'm worried about when it comes to benghazi is red. blood red. the death of four americans. what motivates senator mccain and myself is that we were in libya last september. we came back and wrote an op ed piece that if we don't form a national army to replace these militias, libya is going to break apart. and the sad story here is not just the four dead americans, which is heart breaking, the libyan people want to move forward and this leading from behind by obama, we've done nothing to help them mr. an army to replace the militia. >> steve: absolutely. we've simply got to get to the bottom of this because as you said, four americans are dead here. senator lindsey graham, joining u
morning. a day of negotiations and talks with the secretary of state clinton. the united nations secretary-general and the egyptian president. there is still no cease-fire announced thus far. but while they're carrying out their talks, the violence on both side of the border have intensified as well. gaza came under heavy fire overnight from the air and warships in the sea, pummeling hamas' command and control center, the rocket launcher by the ied. the defense forces say they have destroyed 50 underground rockets in sight. the ied says the rockets were fired from gaza to the populated areas in israel. fortunately they were intercepted by the iron dome. so it's a very precarious situation. >> you are right, lama, a strange 24 hours. early word yesterday that a cease-fire was in the making. as you said, the bombings continued here. so where do things stand now in terms of any chance for a cease-fire? >> well, the secretary of state meeting, the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu quite late last night. the message is that the escalation of the violence here. and to support a long-term
to united nations has remained under fire. we'll also touch on black friday. joining me is anna navarro. good morning. >> good morning, carol. good morning. >> good morning. on to our first topic. is overover, anna? >> well, it sure has a nice ring to it. i say good job to chambliss. your pledge should be to your country, your god, your spouse. that's what it is. i come at this from the jeb bush school of thought. couple of months ago he was being asked about this in congress and he said you don't outsource your convictions. that's exactly the right thing to say and the right thing to think. you should act because that's how you want to act. not because you are being held bound by some pledge. >> and maria, what does this mean for talks on the fiscal cliff? >> well, i actually think it's positive. because it gives republicans lee way to do the right thing. and chambliss was right on in basically saying he cares more about his country. i wasn't at the -- was at the dnc in the early '90s. when bush won he said this is my pledge. no new taxes. when he had to raise taxes, it wasn't the rais
. the campaign intended to overthrow the government is being condemned by the united nations. civilians are fleeing as the rebels move towards the next potential battleground. regional leaders will meet in uganda tomorrow and relief warning of a growing humanitarian crisis. signs wall street is encouraged by black friday shopping trends. the dow, s&p and nasdaq all closing up more than 1% in an abbreviated post thanksgiving trading day, it is fifth straight day of gains for the stock market. and the first time since election day the dow closed above 13,000. black friday started early for a number of leading retailers who opened their doors to shoppers last night. and you are looking at the hall from a massive drug bust. in kentucky police say a garage was stacked to the ceiling with trash bags filled with thousands of pounds of marijuana worth more than $2.5 million. authorities also seized more than $1 million in cash. four illegal immigrants are under arrest and police say the suspects have ties to a notorious mexican drug cartel. and the official white house christmas tree has arrive
, the republicans determination, too well the north into the unit that could win a national election without any southern support, republicans repeatedly condemned the south as aggressive, undemocratic, even un-american. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, southern sectional radicals known as fire eaters, those people who preached the gospel of this union, they took to the public platform and to the newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had to act immediately to protect itself from the hatred of evil republicans, cries of secession filled the southern air. now, this was not the first time sectional crisis had gripped the country, however. there have been several sharp sectional disputes prior to 1860. each of these, each of the major ones had been settled by a compromise. here i will point specifically to the four critical ones. first, the constitutional convention of 1787 in philadelphia. the missouri crisis of 1820, had to do with the admission of missouri as a slave state, the future slavery in the louisiana purchase which, of course
are barred from challenging any of his decisions. a united nations official expressed serious concern saying this could cause a volatile situation. >>> a woman clowning around near the tomb of the unknowns and a worker that took the picture was fired. she was snapped pointing her middle finger shouting near an arlington national cemetery sign that asked for silence and respect. they took that on a paid trip by their employer. >>> halle berry's ex-boyfriend released on $20,000 bail, after getting into a fight with her current fiance outside her l.a. home thursday. gabriel aubry was hospitalized and later arrested on battery misdemeanor charges. aubry and halle are in a bitter custody dispute. >>> it is back in business this morning. mary thompson joins us from the new york stock exchange. good morning. >> good morning, thomas. markets close early this post holiday session. investors are looking to build on recent games. s and p and nasdaq up the last four sessions. what's on focus? retail stocks, given we had the official kickoff for the shopping season, many yesterday. also investors watch g
. >> thank you. >> coming up on c-span, live to new york city where the united nations security council is meeting to discuss the current middle east violence between israel and palestine. that is set for 330 eastern, again, on our companion network, c-span. tonight in prime time here on c-span2, author mark friedman discusses his new book, the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond midlife. he discusses how the baby boom generation is switching to new careers later in life. that begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern, again, here on c-span2. >> there are many people who might even take issue with grants saving the union during the civil war. didn't lincoln do that? well, yes, he did, and i'm not going to see grant was the only person to save the union, but he was the commanding general of the army's dumping of lincoln's policies into effect. he was the general who accepted the surrender of the army of northern virginia that ended the war. if anybody won the war on the battlefield, if you could say that any one person did, and of course you can't. one of the things we do in history is generali
an unfair labor practices claim against the united food and commercial workers with the national labor relations board charging that this union is, in effect, mounting a stealth effort through this group to unionize wal-mart's workforce. one fair labor is working wal-mart. texas. unfair labor is seeing your healthcare premiums skyrocket year after year. unfair labor is being denied the hours needed to support your family. >> historically, the plaintiff's bar has viewed wal-mart as being a place where employees are exploited, low paid, long working hours no job security. >> for its part the united food and commercial workers union says wal-mart is just grasping at straws here, greg. >> greg: they make about $10 to $11 an hour which is fairly consistent with retail. we have been waiting for a ruling from the national labor relations board. do we have any idea how that ruling might go? >> well, the math does not bode well for wal-mart. the nlrb is presently comprised of three board members. three democrats and one republic. of the democrats two were placed on the boarded by president obam
. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on in vote, the yeas are 397, the nays are four. 2/3 being in the affirmative, without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the house will be in order. if you have conversations, i would suggest you take them outside. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from mississippi, mr. palazzo seek recognition? for what purpose? mr. palazzo: address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. recognized for one minute. let me see if we can quiet it down a bit. if you have conversations, please take them somewhere else other than the chamber. mr. palazzo: it is an honor to stand before you to recognize chairman hall and his work
, in fact, early 1793. it's the beginning of the first bank of the united states. we have -- europeans lending to the u.s. really since the nation began. and lending to the country itself, but also, a lot of private lending and a lot of private lending is -- turns out to be not very good at paying it back and so the failure to pay back led to the 1819 panic. same thing in 1837 and again in 1857. our reputation in britain in the early part of the 19th century is terrible. we're -- they call us again and again a nation of defalters, a nation of deadbeats effectively. >> the terms like dead have a negative connotation and not for lending and borrowing, if it weren't for debt we wouldn't be the country we are today, would we? >> that's right. i mean, we could not have expanded west. there's an image of freehold pioneers, you know, broadening in to the west. relying on nothing but the first institution that really spreads america to the west is the store. the store provides the european goods that are necessary, plow points and all these other sorts of things and we borrow and borrow to mak
review and smaller units and not have such a large interlinked bread where they are transmitted thousands of miles. host: profits are up, why does the private sector expect taxpayers to foot the bill -- she writes -- nationalize it. guest: the reality is that we do not need taxpayers to modernize the grid, the electricity industry has become the lowest of all industries in terms of reinvesting for research and development and new infrastructure on an annualized basis. i do not know if anyone heard the advertisement that the railroad industry is running. they said we were going to spend $23 million in reinvesting the freight railroad for the future. i started thinking about that. the freight railroad industry is much smaller than the electricity industry. utilities spend about $10 billion in reinvestment. we need a regulatory initiative to allow the utilities to recover the investments that they make in bonafide, long-term investments to the grid. yes, they will have to pay, but i think of what we've discovered with hurricane sandy is that consumers and taxpayers are going to pay through t
to invest in our nation's infrastructure can cause the united states $129 billion a year and over the next 10 years. u.s. businesses would pay $430 billion in transportation costs, household incomes will fall by 7000, and exports will fall by $28 billion. meanwhile, we are falling behind in the global economy. china invests 9% in gross domestic product and infrastructure. here in america, we spend less than 2% of gdp on infrastructure. it is constant bipartisan support that can help close these gaps, restored bridges and water systems. we can do something about telecommunications across this nation, allowing us to build a twenty first century infrastructure. it can work to create jobs all across america. well paying jobs that can't be outsourced. we are once again making things in america, and this is a great nation that has been built on bricks and mortar and fiber optics. we have got to get back to doing that again. we do not have the time or the luxury to play little games. we did pass job legislation right now including an infrastructure by, when that will create jobs, spur investment,
on immigration. here we go. michael graham. >> if you want a communist united states and work and make our nation better while making yourself better, come on! we've got legal immigration as marco said. if you're coming here because i want to live in america everything is free in america there's no country in the world says hey, send us your deadbeats so we can put them on the deadbeat dole as soon as they arrive. it is a crazy message. it is a slap in the face to the millions and millions of legal immigrants who come here, work and then their tax dollars go to pay bums to live off of our system. >> stephanie: at least he has a soothing tone of voice. >> how come everybody is so yelly today? >> stephanie: i don't know. >> because romney lost black guy in the white house! [ ♪ "jeopardy" theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: who said pakistanis fight against indians. greeks and turks and palestinians. different cultures fight over ethnic and geographic grudges from the past. here in america, they come together to build a future
and around the nation took due note that something big was happening in texas. the new york times reported that president love it had attracted an array of the learning such as had seldom been assembled in the united states. another paper waxed mystically and observed that the president's speech coincided with the early evening appearance of both jupiter and venus and suggested that the evening sky was an all glory of a bright future for the institute. not every newspaper was as perceptive or trance jed -- transcended. one local journal reported the founding of rice in the same column that the news that congo, the largest circus elephant, was coming to town. as i said i will keep my remarks a great great great deal shorter, but i would like to close with a personal word of congratulations to the president on having the privilege to serve at rice during its centennial. i am delighted to have the opportunity to call him president once again. any of you who have been to supreme court note that the justices on that court are used to asking lawyers a lot of question period today we will turn th
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